Are Rabbits Kosher? Your Questions Answered.

Categorized as Bunny Facts Tagged

Last Updated on August 3, 2022 by Rei Garnet

Rabbits are not kosher because they don’t chew their cud and don’t have split hooves, which are required by the Torah in order to be considered kosher.

Kosher animals include cows, sheep, goats, deer, chickens, ducks, geese, turkeys, pigeons, salmon, tuna, pike, flounder, carp, and herring.

An example of non-kosher animals is pigs, rabbits, squirrels, deer, dogs, cats, camels, horses, catfish, sturgeon, swordfish, lobster, shellfish, crabs, water mammals, reptiles, amphibians, worms, and insects.

Now that I’ve given you the gist of the article, read on as I explain in more detail why rabbits are not kosher:

How do you define kosher?

A photo of a cow which is considered kosher

For an animal to be considered kosher, it must chew its cud and have split hooves.

For example, cows, sheep, and goats are kosher because they chew their cud and have split hooves.

Pigs have split hooves but don’t chew their cud, so it’s not kosher.

Cud is a portion of food that returns from an animal’s stomach back to its mouth to be chewed a second time.

In addition, all warm-blooded kosher animals must undergo kosher slaughter (shechitah) and salting before being eaten.

Thus, even if the animal is kosher but the kitchen (the way it’s slaughtered, equipment, and utensils) is not, it wouldn’t be considered kosher to eat.

As for fish and seafood, in order to be considered kosher, they must have fins and scales.

Here’s a list of kosher animals:

  • Cows
  • Sheeps
  • Goats
  • Deers
  • Chickens
  • Ducks
  • Geese
  • Turkeys
  • Pigeons
  • Salmons
  • Tuna
  • Pike
  • Flounder
  • Carp
  • Herring

Here’s a list of non-kosher animals:

  • Pigs
  • Rabbits
  • Squirrels
  • Dears
  • Dogs
  • Cats
  • Camels
  • Horses
  • Catfish
  • Sturgeon
  • Swordfish
  • Lobster
  • Shellfish
  • Crabs
  • Water mammals
  • Reptiles
  • Amphibians
  • Worms
  • Insects

Why are rabbits not kosher?

A picture of rabbits feet which shows that it doesnt have split hooves thus its not kosher
“Pygmy rabbit feet” by USFWS Pacific is licensed under CC BY-NC 2.0

In order to be considered kosher, an animal must chew its cud and have split hooves.

While rabbits have “toes”, those are not considered split hooves as required by the Torah.

Finally, rabbits are not kosher because they are not ruminants (large-hoofed herbivores that chew their cud).

Rabbits graze and process grass the same way we digest our food.

Conclusion

Rabbits are not considered kosher because they don’t chew their cud and their hooves are not split.

Both of which are required by the Torah to be considered kosher.

Rabbits graze and digest grass and other food the same way we digest our food.

And while rabbits have ‘toes’, it’s not a split hooves like cows, sheep, or goats.

Cite this article:

Bunny Horde (September 15, 2022) Are Rabbits Kosher? Your Questions Answered.. Retrieved from https://bunnyhorde.com/are-rabbits-kosher/.
"Are Rabbits Kosher? Your Questions Answered.." Bunny Horde - September 15, 2022, https://bunnyhorde.com/are-rabbits-kosher/

Welcome to Bunnyhorde
Welcome to Bunnyhorde

Sources and further reading

Read our latest posts


By Rei Garnet

I’ve loved and cared for rabbits since I was 9 years old, and I’m here to share my passion for rabbits. My objective is to help rabbit owners give their rabbits the best life possible.